Monday, November 7, 2016

Sun/Shade & Urban Development – October 2016

The following relate to urban development and urban design in general, and to specific projects with sun/shade issues in particular. They were derived from our twitter feed @SunPosition


Wow >

Galleria Mall developers file application for 12 residential towers | via @buzzbuzzhome

gallery-mall-development-aerial

“About a year after BuzzBuzzNews first reported Freed Developments and Elad Canada purchased the Galleria Mall, a development application for the 12-acre site in west-end Toronto has been filed to the City, the City’s planning department confirms.

Galleria Developments, a joint venture between the two builders, filed the application today, a spokesperson for the developer says in an email.

The application proposes 3,416 residential units across 12 towers — these will also contain office and retail space — ranging from 10 to 42 storeys. Proposed residential space amounts to 222,895 square metres of residential space, BuzzBuzzNews has learned.”…

“Galleria Developments has hired on Hariri Pontarini Architects as the architecture firm for the project.”…

https://t.co/fOXeSjBhxC


Toronto hospital wins architecture's highest honour | Construction Canada

Bridgepoint Active Healthcare (Photo credit: Tom Arban) (CNW Group/Sinai Health System)

“Bridgepoint Active Healthcare in Toronto recently received the Governor General’s Medal in Architecture, considered to be the highest recognition for architecture in Canada.

Designed by Stantec Architecture, KPMB Architects, HDR Architecture, and Diamond Schmitt Architects, the key principles of design for Bridgepoint include:

  • maximizing natural daylight and views;
  • using natural materials and elements that support individuals as they progress through a gradual rehabilitation process;
  • designing social and dining spaces that encourage interaction, good nutrition, and promote self-efficacy;
  • optimizing the therapeutic benefits of access to nature and landscape; and
  • connecting and integrating the campus with the community.”…

https://t.co/kpJLuTKM22


RT Elena Christpoulos ‏@Elenach Yes, all cities do have parking problems. #Amsterdam #dcp #theplansm @santamonicacity @SustainableSM @urb_mag

> Seems to be an epidemic of parking problems in Holland. I took this pic in Assen. @Elenach @urb_mag @santamonicacity @SustainableSM

https://t.co/NcuWKuBD7d

> Lennart Nout ‏@lennartnout:  @Elenach @AxleRyde @santamonicacity @SustainableSM @urb_mag all *successful* cities have a parking problem :)

> Sacha! ‏@sachalovesyoga:  @Elenach @SaMoCole wowww! I've never seen bike parking like that!


RT SkyriseCities ‏@skyrisecities Concrete Core of Latest @KohnPedersenFox Office Tower in #CanaryWharf Shooting Skywards. http://ow.ly/VQrb304VQTy #London #RealEstate #Design


Opponents play shadow card >

Neighbors Double Down Against Mission District Affordable Housing | Mission Local

The proposed project at 1296 Shotwell St. Design by Herman Coliver Locus.

“Some of the same neighbors who in May opposed a nine-story, fully affordable housing project coming to Shotwell Street have continued their opposition, saying at a meeting on Wednesday that the building was too tall, too dense, and had too little parking.

“In this neighborhood we only have three stories,” said Lucy, a Shotwell Street neighbor who declined to give her last name. Lucy and seven other people attended a meeting at the Mission Cultural Center to oppose a 94-unit senior housing development coming to 1296 Shotwell St. near Cesar Chavez Street.”…

…” the conversation turned to shadow impact and wind tunnels.

The nearly two-hour meeting saw shadow impact projections, evidence that wind tunnels would not be created, and maps of nearby transit. All were presented in a bid to convince neighbors that the height of the building would contribute neither to the availability of sun, parking congestion, or fierce gusts.

That bid, however, was ultimately unsuccessful, as neighbors reiterated their demand for a “compromise” to allow for some affordable housing, but not nine stories’ worth.”…

https://t.co/U2V6VnjTUx


New Trackside Center plans drop building from six stories to four | Davis Enterprise @Felicia__A__

Trackside-southeast-cornerW-1024x483[1]

“Developers have trimmed down their plans for the proposed Trackside Center, a mixed-use infill project that would sit on Third Street at the edge of downtown.

The revised Trackside Center would see a 48-foot-tall, four-story building with 9,100 square feet of commercial on the bottom floor and 27 apartments on the remaining floors. A 3-foot-tall parapet would make the tallest spot on the building 51 feet from the ground.

By comparison, the original Trackside Center proposed a 78-foot tall, six-story building that would include 9,900 square feet for retail, 48 units and underground parking with 55 spaces.

The latest plans arrive almost one year after residents of the adjacent Old East Davis neighborhood turned out in force at city commission meetings to oppose the building.

The height of the original building fell under the most scrutiny last year, as neighbors said the building would overshadow the “small-town character” of the adjacent one- to two-story bungalows.

Signs protesting the height and potential shadow of the six-story building continue to dot lawns throughout Old East Davis one year later.”…

https://t.co/5kjSzfoyAM 


5 of our Clients on list. Congrats! >

The top 10 Toronto developments on @BuzzBuzzHome in September 2016

Garrison Point

Garrison Point by Diamondcorp, Cityzen Development Group and Fernbrook Homes

minto westside

Minto Westside by Minto

https://t.co/NeancMqjZZ


Designing and Simulating Daylight | Construction Canada

figure-xx-nanaimo-hospital

“The benefits of daylight are well-documented. For building occupants, it offers a range of positive physiological effects, which, in turn, translates into tangible benefits such as higher productivity, reduced employee sick time, improved employee morale, and lower lighting costs for businesses.

Building occupants, owners, and policy-makers are increasingly aware of these benefits and are asking for buildings to be well-lit by natural light. Daylighting design and simulation is the way to make this happen—to quantifiably understand how light enters a building and to determine how to achieve the project’s daylight goals.

Daylighting is emphasized in green building standards, such as the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. Daylight targets based on LEED are even being included as requirements for projects not pursuing certification.”…

https://t.co/td2YShGFfL


Urban Cayman‏ @ProjectEND Statistics and new image of 2 Carlton by @ibigroup:

> Kyle Miller ‏@kyleplans: @ProjectEND @ibigroup I don't believe that's a position the sun has ever occupied in the Toronto sky

> Shawn Micallef‏ @shawnmicallef:  @kyleplans @DSGcondos @ibigroup @ProjectEND ask @SunPosition about this

> Well, the sun might be a tad too close to the tower as it appears to be melting. @shawnmicallef @kyleplans @DSGcondos @ibigroup @ProjectEND


RT SkyriseCities ‏@skyrisecities Surpassing the Transamerica Pyramid, @salesforce Tower Becomes San Francisco's Tallest. http://ow.ly/MDtx305cgdg #RealEstate #Architecture

Artistic depiction Salesforce Tower, San Francisco, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architect

> 61 storeys, 326m tall. That's a massive floor-to-floor height. This 61-storey building is easily equivalent to 100+ storeys.


RT Shawn Micallef ‏@shawnmicallef  Neat condo!

> RT Chris Drew ‏@chrisjamesdrew:  @shawnmicallef has a point tower so the shadow impact will move across adjacent sites quickly :)

> Quite a hefty podium though. @chrisjamesdrew @shawnmicallef

> Apparently you can tell the time from that point tower :) @chrisjamesdrew @shawnmicallef


Height reduction = shadow reduction >

BPDA Approves Twelve Residential Units for 171 Tremont St Boston | Beacon Hill Times

“Late last week, the Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA), formerly the Boston Redevelopment Authority, approved the proposed project slated for 171 Tremont Street, located next to the Boston Common.

This project will include the construction of a 13-story building with 12 residential units, a welcoming lobby, and a public park in the Mason Place pedestrian walkway. This new building will replace the current four-story office building.”…

“Due to local opposition, including to the possible effects the spire might have on shadows on the Common and traffic on the surrounding streets, a decrease in height from 355 to 175 feet including rooftop mechanical equipment has been approved.

Since the project will be built as-of-right dimensions in accordance with the Zoning Code, it will no longer exceed the restrictions of the ‘shadow bank’ created under Chapter 362 of the Acts of 1990, the Public Common Shadow Act.

Because the proposed project is being developed at an as-of-right height, it is no longer required to comply with the Public Commons Shadow Act.

Due to the slim massing form and diminutive floor plate, the resulting new shadows casts by the project continue to be slight and narrow according to the BPDA.

Additionally, the shadow impacts associated with the project have been reduced as a result of the reduction in building height. The most shadow impacts will occur before the noon hour.

The BPDA says these impacts are very small due to the sitting of the building in the path of shadow cast by the Ritz Carlton Hotel and Ritz Carlton Residences at 10 Avery Street.

During the remaining periods, new shadows either fall on the roofs of existing buildings, or within shadows cast by existing buildings. During these periods, no new shadow is cast on sidewalks or public open space.”

https://t.co/xquwmuKvFC


Cheers, Ralph

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