Monday, October 9, 2017

Sun/Shade & Urban Development – September 2017

The following relate to urban development and urban design in general, and to specific projects with sun/shade issues in particular. They were derived from our twitter feed @SunPosition


Take our Survey: How Important To You Is Sunshine?... https://t.co/M7OXNehQGf


Pro-Housing Urban Millennials Say 'Yes In My Backyard' | @Sierra_Magazine

Denver is one of many cities pursuing sustainable development.

…”Pittsburgh and other cities are taking a leading role in the fight against global warming—and growth and prosperity are part of the plan. Standard efforts include negotiating with local utilities to switch to renewable energy and beefing up green infrastructure like mass transit. In addition, a new movement, composed largely of millennials, is pushing hard on city leaders to make their cities denser and more walkable and bikeable, with green infill development, more affordable housing, and transit-oriented centers. In a twist on the popular label of those skeptical of urban development, these new activists proudly adopt the mantle of YIMBY—"Yes In My Backyard."

“Studies have established a clear correlation between urban density and reduced carbon emissions. A 2014 report from the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed population density in more than 30,000 zip codes in all 50 states along with 37 variables, including household income, transportation, and census data. It found that families living in denser urban cores had a carbon footprint that was half that of families living in suburbs.

But density by itself doesn't necessarily reduce carbon emissions. The key factor, says Daniel Kammen, professor of energy at UC Berkeley and one of the study's principal investigators, is the relationship between urban density and smart growth. "We found that if you integrate living and work and services, you benefit hugely by smart densification," he says. "But if you have huge high-rise blocks that are totally disconnected from shopping and downtown services, then you don't benefit much at all."”…

“"If you can create a land-use configuration that will encourage people to take transit more often, to bike, and to walk, you're really making an improvement as far as reducing congestion, reducing vehicle emissions, and reducing energy use," says Andrew Goetz, a professor of geography and the environment at the University of Denver.”…

“"This isn't about my backyard," says Bernstein. "It's about all of our backyards, and how we are going to sacrifice and be innovative together."”

https://t.co/SkCOAK9Ip8


Massive highrise moves ahead despite city staff recommendations | Global News

HALIFAX – “A vote by municipal councillors to move ahead with a 29-storey highrise proposal is being met with mixed reviews. 

“I’m deeply disappointed in council’s decision to move ahead with the proposed height of this building situated on the Halifax common,” said Kenna Manos, a Halifax resident who’s been actively engaged in public hearings on the development.”…

“When this building first came forward to council for consideration it came at a proposed 22 storeys, and then it came back again at 28 storeys, and then it came back again at 29 storeys,” Watts said.

The development proposal remained at 29 storeys, despite strong public opposition that came forth in hearings and through written submissions to council.”…

“A city staff report recommended the building be limited to 20 storeys because the extra nine storeys would be too much for the area.

Council voted against that report.”…

““It’s right across from the common, it will create huge wind and shadow problems, not to mention things like traffic, which will greatly be impacted by three parking levels for the building.”

Watts says from here staff will develop a land use bylaw for the site, it will go back to council after that and be followed by another public hearing where citizens will have the opportunity to provide comment to council again before a final decision is made.”

https://t.co/eQn8L4uSUy


Millennium promises shorter Winthrop Sq. tower | CommonWealth Magazine

Millennium promises shorter Winthrop Sq. tower

“THE DEVELOPER MILLENNIUM PARTNERS agreed on Monday to cut the height of its proposed tower in Winthrop Square from 775 feet to at least 702 feet to ease concerns raised about the building’s impact on flight patterns out of Logan International Airport. The lower height, presumably, will also reduce the building’s shadow impact on Boston Common.”…

The Winthrop Square tower has already stirred concerns about the building’s shadow impact on the Boston Common and the Public Garden. Indeed, a bill allowing the greater shadow impact on the two parks was signed into law by Gov. Charlie Baker in late July.”

https://t.co/2lKNdBpvWa


Millennium Partners Cuts Winthrop Square Skyscraper Height By 75 Feet | Biznow Boston

Millennium Partners Cuts Winthrop Square Skyscraper Height By 75 Feet

“A downtown skyscraper proposal scrutinized by Boston park advocates for the shadow it will cast will no longer be as tall as originally proposed, but it is not because of the city's green spaces.

Millennium Partners' 775-foot skyscraper proposed at 115 Winthrop Square exceeded recommended Federal Aviation Administration height limits that influence development surrounding Logan International Airport.”…

“The developer’s proposal, which was chosen from six contenders for the Winthrop Square project, was the tallest in the competition. Its 775-foot design exceeded the 710 to 725 feet recommended for the site on Massport’s airspace map.”…

https://t.co/m4FikoVeap


Toronto urban planning: What is a shadow worth? | via @torontostoreys

Is the cost of a shadow worth homelessness, overcrowding, and overpricing? Some people argue yes. But many urban planners think not ...

“Municipal planners in Toronto face a multitude of dilemmas. When it comes to new housing, many of the suggestions and concerns from locals are completely justified, yet others are complete nonsense.

How does a planner, a policy maker and a city cut through the frivolous complaints and decide exactly where to split the difference between locals with justified concerns, the financial realities of the developer, and a desperate market need for new housing?

What is a shadow worth? What is privacy worth?

If a mid-rise building is cut down by one floor and loses 14 units, is that a fair trade if three single-family houses no longer have shadows on them and penthouse apartment dwellers can’t see into their backyard? If a proposed condominium tower needs further separation from the adjacent building and 35 units are lost, but 15 townhouse owners and 20 rental apartment tenants no longer have their south-facing city views blocked, is that a fair trade?”…

Read on…

https://t.co/rhFQ1rOEws


Cheers, Ralph

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