Monday, October 26, 2015

Special 'Torontohenge' sunset to wow commuters | CBC News

Sun will set perfectly in line with the city grid at 6:17 p.m. on Monday

You could be in for a spectacular sight on your way home tonight as the sun sets perfectly in line with the city's east-west street grid: a phenomenon known as "Torontohenge."

The sun will set at 6:17 p.m., and the current clear conditions suggest it'll be a nice night to watch it drop in line with Toronto's major east-west streets like King, Queen and Bloor.

It might be a delight for photographers, but the setting sun can make driving difficult.

The sun has been setting in similar positions all week. But Ralph Bouwmeester, who specializes in tracking the sun and shadows, tweeted that today will be the optimal day for seeing "Torontohenge".

The "henge" part of the name is a reference to England's famous Stonehenge, which was built so the rising sun aligns in a specific way during the summer solstice.

Manhattanhenge, in New York, always generates thousands of photos.

Send us your pictures using the #torontohenge hashtag, or by tagging @cbctoronto in your post. 

Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-sunset-torontohenge-1.3289614#commentwrapper

Cheers, Ralph

Saturday, October 24, 2015

Torontohenge October 2015

Watch as the sun sets along Toronto's east/west streets on Monday Oct 26/15 at 6:17 pm.

Cheers, Ralph

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Sun Glare While Driving – September 2015

The following relate to the dangers of sun glare while driving, and traffic safety in general. They were derived from our twitter feed @SunPosition


Read our weekly news summary “Sun Glare and Driving” at:   http://paper.li/SunPosition/1376354290


Drivers, watch for kids and buses especially in the early morning low sun.


Keep your eyes on the road, your hands up on the wheel: The Doors


Back to school safety tip - if your shadow points toward oncoming traffic, chances are the driver can't see you.


Distracted texting - don't drive while texting. You'll make a lot of spelling mistakes.


Sun glare is one thing, but no excuse for hit-and-run >

Bicyclist seriously injured in hit-and-run crash | via @KDVR

A bicyclist was seriously injured in a hit-and-run crash near South Sheridan Boulevard and West Dartmouth Avenue on Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015. While officers were investigating, a second vehicle (background) crashed into a patrol car, most likely because of sun glare.

A bicyclist was seriously injured in a hit-and-run crash near South Sheridan Boulevard and West Dartmouth Avenue in Denver on Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015. While officers were investigating, a second vehicle (background) crashed into a patrol car, most likely because of sun glare…

http://t.co/XIDWUA5FQQ


Anticipate sun glare as you round corners >

Child struck by car; sun glare contributes | Cedar City News

A driver with the early morning sun in her eyes swerved to avoid children walking in a residential neighborhood, but she struck a child on the other side of the road…

http://t.co/0SnjALrRc2


Sun glare suspected cause >

2 Thornton city workers hurt in accident | via @9News

635776122437287401-policesiren

Two city workers from Thornton were injured after a woman hit a message trailer, causing it to spin into their direction.

The incident happened just before 6:50 p.m. near St. Paul Street and Thornton Parkway…

Police say the driver might have been blinded by sun glare when she ran into the trailer…

http://t.co/785hBtociU


Jogging may be good for you, but not on wrong side of road & toward low sun. Saw car swerve and miss jogger last second.


The sun rises and sets in line with e/w roads at this time of year. Be extra careful driving, walking, jogging and biking.


Sun glare suspected >

Pedestrian Dies in Church Road Crash 

PedestrianCrash-287x300[1]

Cheltenham Police report that an accident on Tuesday involving a pedestrian struck by a car near the rear entrance to Einstein Elkins Park Hospital on Church Road has resulted in the death of the victim.

Nancy Wright of N. Third Street in Philadelphia was transported by Cheltenham Township Emergency Medical Services to the trauma center at Abington Memorial Hospital, where she later died as the result of her injuries.

Police believe Wright was attempting to cross the street mid-block and was in the middle of the road when hit. The driver, an Elkins Park resident, immediately stopped and remained at the scene. She is cooperating fully with the investigation, said police in a release to the press. Sun glare is a possible contributing factor.

Police responded to the 911 call at about 8:50 a.m… 

http://t.co/7n8qcnhHJ8


Sun glare possible factor >

Fatal bike vs. truck accident renewing talk about rights of the road

BRECKSVILLE, Ohio - A fatal accident involving bikes and a truck are renewing discussions about the rights of the road.

The accident happened at just after 7 p.m. Thursday.

According to reports, a pick-up truck was driving west on Snowville Road and was starting to make a left turn onto Dewey Road.

It's a T-shaped intersection, and as the pick-up made the turn, the driver struck or was struck by one or more of the five bicycles that were traveling east on Snowville Road.

One of the bicyclists died at the scene. Four others were taken to area hospitals.

Sun glare may have been a factor in the incident, but police are still investigating how it all happened.

http://t.co/knY3j4Wazi


We got a shout-out in this article >

Road Warrior: Seasonal blind spots easily turn deadly – by By John Cichowski  - Record Columnist | The Record

Now that he's finished keeping us warm and tan at the Jersey Shore, our old friend Sol is turning ugly again as he shifts his blinding gaze to New Jersey's east-west roadways.

How ugly can sun glare get as autumn approaches?

"Just backing out of my driveway renders me blind," complained Hawthorne's Ken Ross. "Cars coming up behind me on Utter Avenue usually drive waaaay too fast!"

Clifton crossing guard Paula Kurtz said the glare is so severe on her West 2nd Street and 6th Avenue corner that "sometimes I can't see my kids" across the street. "I tell children to wait until I can focus and make sure no cars are coming before I cross them."

Crossing guards probably have it worse than any of us. Just last week, Jo Ann Hans was severely injured at the New Bridge Road crosswalk near Westminster Avenue in Bergenfield while ushering worshipers to Congregation Beth Abraham. Police listed sun glare as a contributing factor in the accident. Sun glare also contributed to the 2012 death of Little Ferry crossing guard Joseph Dotterman, who was helping a 70-year-old cross Mehrhof Road. It was a factor, too, in the critical injuries sustained by Cresskill crossing guard Ned Visich in 2012.

Besides crossing guards, Sol is given at least partial blame for serious North Jersey pedestrian crashes involving joggers, shoppers, schoolchildren and at least one trash collector: Ronald Fisher, who was killed on Godwin Avenue in Ridgewood in 1995.

Glare is believed to have played a role, too, in the death of Robert Carroll, killed crossing Essex Street in Hackensack near his Leigh Street apartment in 2011. It was blamed for injuries sustained by a woman and her 2-year-old granddaughter in the parking lot of a a Walmart in Riverdale in 2009 and two 12-year-olds on their way to middle school in New Milford.

Although federal highway safety authorities don't keep track of sun-glare deaths, some estimates place the national figure at more than 200. These crashes start to pick up in September when the sun rises almost exactly east and sets almost exactly west, so the sun is low enough at the horizon to zap drivers directly in the eyes. It happens again in early spring. But predicting exactly where and when Sol will blind you can be tricky. Anomalies abound.

Reverse glare

While going east to the George Washington Bridge in the afternoon, for example, motorists sometimes face reverse glare from The Modern, the high-rise glass residential tower recently built in Fort Lee, which bounces the rays into their eyes as the sun sets. The Modern is not the only example of danger for motorists driving away from the sun.

"The glare in front of you can wash out the brake lights of the car ahead of you," explained Ralph Bauwmeester [sic], an engineer whose Ontario consultancy advises police, lawyers, accident reconstructionists and motorists about sun-glare issues at sunposition.com.

Drivers can't always count on sound walls to protect them from the sun either. Some motorists complain about glare coming through the clear, acrylic panels at the top of the walls on Route 3 in Lyndhurst.

Here are more North Jersey locations that often draw sun-glare complaints:

  • Going from Paramus Road in Paramus to reach Route 4, called Broadway, is "almost impossible without sun glare because of constant traffic flow," said Ridgewood's Arlene Murphy. "But with sun glare starting around 7:30 in the morning, I literally cannot see anything."
  • Eastbound on Passaic Street approaching Burton Avenue in Hasbrouck Heights "requires looking directly into the sun as you reach the crosswalk at the crest of the hill," said Jeanette DeGennaro. "If you combine this with distracted driving, it's a recipe for accidents and worse."
  • On Cedar Lane eastbound in Teaneck around 7 a.m., "I can block the sun with my left arm, but even worse is the glare bouncing off the shop windows on my right," said Dave Boesch.
  • Beech Street near Hackensack High School is the place where blinding glare prompted David Beyer to quickly turn right onto Comet Way. It's also the place where a cop gave him a ticket for going the wrong way on Comet, a one-way street.
  • Glare can be found almost anywhere on Route 80, said Conrad Macina of Mount Arlington, especially near Route 15 in the afternoon.
  • Eastbound on Clinton Avenue in Bergenfield near the middle school is Patricia DiLorenzo's scariest place to drive. Glare caused her car to be hit from the rear there. "I was taken away by ambulance, but not seriously hurt," reported the Maywood reader.
  • While heading west out of Liberty State Park in Jersey City just before sunset to the New Jersey Turnpike, the sun is so strong that it makes searching for an exit nearly impossible, said Pat Kinney.

"What can a driver do?" asked the Leonia reader.

Here are some tips from Bauwmeester [sic]and others:

"Put your visor down and have your Polarized sunglasses within reach," said the Canadian expert. "Don't keep other stuff attached to your visor, because it's likely that you won't use it when you need it because you'll be afraid it'll fall in your lap."

Conrad Macina thinks he knows why many male motorists don't use visors.

"They think they're effeminate," he observed. "They're not. They help. I'd rather be thought of as a girly-girl than deadly dead."

Steve Carellas of the National Motorists Association suggested keeping a backup visor in the car: a baseball cap.

Clean windshields

AAA recommended slowing down and turning on headlights to improve visibility for oncoming motorists. The automobile club also suggested regularly cleaning windshields. Avoid vinyl cleaners, too, because they give dashboards a glossy finish that increases glare, said the experts.

Many readers suggested leaving work a bit early or late to avoid sunny danger. Patricia DiLorenzo, the driver who fears Passaic Street in Hasbrouck Heights, said she uses her flashers as she waits at lights or approaches dangerous intersections. Under glare conditions, Jeanette DeGennaro leaves more space between her car and the one ahead.

Accident reconstructionist Rich Pedersen offered this practical advice for blocking Sol's dangerous glare: "Get behind an 18-wheeler or a large truck," recommended the Bergenfield reader.

http://t.co/jH8gqn9pRm


Severe sun glare cited >

Syracuse Police Car Seriously Injures Bicyclist In Crash 

A bicyclist is hospitalized in serious condition after he was hit by an unmarked Syracuse car Wednesday in the town of Onondaga.

State police say they responded to the scene on Split Rock Road at around 4:50pm and found 56-year-old Thomas Frechette suffering from internal injuries and was taken to Upstate University Hospital.  Troopers spoke to Syracuse police officer Dennis Regin, who told them that his vision was obscured by "severe sun glare" when he turned into the path of Frechette.  The investigation into the crash continues.

http://t.co/1NAue2dB89


Fall Driving Tips | GordnerCoombs Insurance Inc.

Fall Driving Tips

PennDOT reminds motorists that wet leaves, fog, sun glare and frost are a few driving hazards that they will encounter this fall but there are steps drivers can take to help make their commutes safer...

Other fall hazards for motorists can be fog and sun glare…

Sun glare can be most problematic during sunrise and sunset which coincide with morning and evening rush hours. The intense glare from the sun on the horizon can blind a driver, causing an unexpected traffic slowdown. Drivers can prepare for the glare by keeping a set of sunglasses handy, removing clutter from their sun visors and keeping the inside of their vehicle´s windshield clean…

http://t.co/b1dSfzc4Q4


Bike Cleveland | Working For Safer Streets | Crash Not Accident

crash-not-accident.jpg.662x0_q70_crop-scale

By now many of you have heard about the tragedy on Snowville Road in Brecksville last Thursday. At 7:10 PM, a group of riders traveling east down Snowville Road were struck by a person traveling in a truck attempting to make a left hand turn onto Dewey Ave, leaving four injured and one dead. It has been less than a day since the incident and the response has ranged from sadness, to dismay, to the inevitable victim blaming and mantra of “accidents happen.”

Calling a collision by a licensed automobile operator who failed to yield the right of way to an oncoming two-wheeled vehicle an “accident” is wrong. It was completely preventable, so let’s call it what it was: a crash. We don’t have “plane accidents”, we have “plane crashes” where we investigate and find the cause of the crash, then attempt to mitigate the chances it happens again…

The results of the police investigation are still pending, but knowing that intersection very well it is obvious that the truck failed to yield the right of way. Some news outlets are speculating that sun glare was a contributing factor. I contend that if you cannot see where you are going, then don’t turn across an oncoming lane. Moreover, if you can’t see, pull over and stop driving…

http://t.co/RbRl4rx9dL


Officials say sun glare may be to blame >

Crash between school bus, van kills one near Erie, PA

HARBORCREEK, Pa. (WIVB) — One person is dead after an early morning crash involving a van and a school bus filled with kids near Erie in Pennsylvania.

Police say sun glare may be to blame for a minivan slamming into the back of the bus on Station Road in Harborcreek at around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

http://t.co/0akgXKV0kV


It's that time of year again when sun glare crashes increase due to rising/setting sun along east-west roads. Be prepared.


Prepare for driving in sun glare. Clean windshield, clear visor so you can actually use it, clear dash, polarized sunglasses ready.


Drivers, pedestrians & cyclists take note. Sun glare is more intense this time of year when weather is cool, clear and free of haze.


Good advice here re driving in sunglare >

Blinded By The Light | The Legal Examiner

Rain, snow, ice, and fog are typically the first things to come to mind when we think dangerous weather conditions. But, the glare from the sun can be equally dangerous. In fact, the sun’s glare causes more than 3,000 auto accidents per year, most occurring during rush hour…

There are several things preventive measures motorists can take:

  • Wear sunglasses with polarized lenses and UV protection.
  • Keep the windshield clean.
  • Turn on headlights.
  • Drive slower and at a safe distance. A driver who cannot determine the color of a traffic light should not be driving through it – especially at the normal, posted speed.
  • Take an alternate route.
  • Most importantly, if you can’t see, don’t drive!

Drivers and pedestrians should be aware that vehicles heading into the sun may not see the traffic light or stop sign and, may not stop…

http://t.co/Hm5tQE0gxB


Shawn Micallef @shawnmicallef:  @SunPosition thought you as I drove into the blinding sun on Sunday in Quebec. People braking on highway 20 cuz sun.

> RB:  Yeah, the low bright sun is brutal these days. Especially with the cool clear weather.

> RB:  Many US street grids are due east-west. They are especially bad for sun at this time of year.


North Jersey locations that often draw sun-glare complaints

  • Going from Paramus Road in Paramus to reach Route 4, called Broadway, is "almost impossible without sun glare because of constant traffic flow," said Ridgewood's Arlene Murphy. "But with sun glare starting around 7:30 in the morning, I literally cannot see anything."
  • Eastbound on Passaic Street approaching Burton Avenue in Hasbrouck Heights "requires looking directly into the sun as you reach the crosswalk at the crest of the hill," said Jeanette DeGennaro. "If you combine this with distracted driving, it's a recipe for accidents and worse."
  • On Cedar Lane eastbound in Teaneck around 7 a.m., "I can block the sun with my left arm, but even worse is the glare bouncing off the shop windows on my right," said Dave Boesch.
  • Beech Street near Hackensack High School is the place where blinding glare prompted David Beyer to quickly turn right onto Comet Way. It's also the place where a cop gave him a ticket for going the wrong way on Comet, a one-way street.
  • Glare can be found almost anywhere on Route 80, said Conrad Macina of Mount Arlington, especially near Route 15 in the afternoon.
  • Eastbound on Clinton Avenue in Bergenfield near the middle school is Patricia DiLorenzo's scariest place to drive. Glare caused her car to be hit from the rear there. "I was taken away by ambulance, but not seriously hurt," reported the Maywood reader.
  • While heading west out of Liberty State Park in Jersey City just before sunset to the New Jersey Turnpike, the sun is so strong that it makes searching for an exit nearly impossible, said Pat Kinney.

http://t.co/yqmBnxE05j


Autumn glare causing problems for Indianapolis drivers | 13 WTHR Indianapolis

INDIANAPOLIS - You could call it a glaring problem at intersections across central Indiana. It pops up this time of the year and it can be downright dangerous. We're talking about sun glare, which is at its worst during the morning and evening rush hours…

Is the blinding sun to blame?  Hard to say, but 1st Sgt Rich Myers with the Indiana State Police said the intense glare does make driving much more hazardous.

"It's a very, very bad time of year," Myers said.  "It's primarily during rush hour and you can see how the sun can cause problems."

Blame it on the fall equinox, when the rising and later, setting sun, aligns perfectly with east west roads. 

"It is something drivers need to be aware of, something they need to look out for," Myers said…

So how can you protect yourself? AAA offers these tips for motorists when driving into the sun:

  • Invest in polarized sunglasses – they can help reduce glare.
  • Utilize your sun visor – it can help to block out the sun.
  • Leave more following room – when the sun is in your eyes it can be hard to see what the car ahead is doing. This is one more time when it pays to leave more room between you and the next vehicle.
  • Drive with your headlights on to increase your visibility to other drivers
  • Keep your windshield clean, inside and out
  • Check your windshield for pitting and cracks
  • Avoid storing papers or other items on the dashboard
  • If having a difficult time seeing the road, use lane markings to help guide you.

http://t.co/0TdXYpkU3z


Beware of blinding equinox | via @MDN

solar glare

Although the weather is tranquil this week, there is one travel hazard that will persist: the glare from the sun. The sun rises and sets in line with east-west roads the next few days, causing a lot of glare, reports the National Weather Service in Grand Rapids. Beware of the "solar slowdowns."

Here are some tips to help make your drive safe:

  • Make sure your windshield is clean on the inside and outside.
  • Run your defroster until the moisture on the window is completely evaporated.
  • Wear sunglasses and use your visor.

http://t.co/RE1vVkTKI6


Sun glare may have been factor in car and horse cart crash

The early morning sun may have been a factor in a crash between a car and a horse-drawn cart near Pawnee City on Wednesday, Pawnee County Sheriff Jayme Reed said.

Kyle Clow, 25, of Pawnee City was driving a 1994 Honda Accord when it collided with the cart driven by Kenneth Yoder, 23, also of Pawnee City. There were no passengers in either vehicle.

The accident happened about 7:30 a.m. about a mile east of Pawnee City on Nebraska 8/50. Both the cart and the car were eastbound…

http://t.co/jyimMTpEWi


The sun sets in line with WB Hwy 401 between Victoria Park and Leslie this week (week of Sep 28/15) in Toronto. Be prepared for sun glare.
Cheers, Ralph

Sun/Shade & Urban Development – September 2015

The following relate to urban development and urban design in general, and to specific projects with sun/shade issues in particular. They were derived from our twitter feed @SunPosition

Check out our weekly news summary “Sun, Shadow & Urban Development” at  http://paper.li/SunPosition/1376522926


Take our Survey: How Important To You Is Sunshine?

Homeowners and tenants are often concerned about the impact that shadowing from a proposed house addition next door, or a high-rise down the street, might have on their property.  In many cases, development is deemed good for a neighbourhood and proceeds on that basis.  After all, in an urban setting, development and re-development are to be expected, right?

But how much is too much in your opinion?  How much new shadow can you reasonably be expected to absorb in order for others' projects to proceed/succeed?

This survey asks you when and where sunshine is important to you.  Spring?  Summer?  Fall?  Winter?  Outdoors?  Indoors?  Patio?  Kitchen? etc. etc.  And how much new shadow is too much?  And does a great project, that improves your neighbourhood, increase your tolerance for new shadowing?

This short survey (2 minutes) seeks input to those questions, and more.

Help us to compile homeowners'/tenants' opinions on this subject - which has become a real challenge for municipalities.  After all, striking a balance between the needs of a municipality as a whole, and the needs of individual residents, is not an easy task for decision-makers.  Help us to better understand this dynamic by participating in this short survey - no sign-in is required and your feedback is completely anonymous.

Thank you kindly for your participation!

http://sunposition.com/sunshine_survey.html


Shadow concerns >

Gulch's tallest building gets conceptual approval | via @Tennessean

635767299187435606-Buckingham

The quest by Buckingham Cos. to build the tallest building in the Gulch got off to a good start Tuesday with the developer winning conceptual approval of its plans from the design review committee of the Metro Development and Housing Agency.

Now the Indianapolis-based company is on a charm offensive, seeking to sell to Gulch residents and others the targeted 38-story height as a solution to reducing the building's impact on its neighbors.

"Going skinnier has a direct positive impact," said architect Chris Cooper of architecture firm SOM, which is designing the mixed-use residential tower planned for a corner of 12th and Division, where a maximum of 28 stories is allowed…

New Terrazzo resident Hope Kirkland brought to Buckingham's meeting neighbors' concerns about the planned building's height restricting the sunlight she enjoys at her condo across the street, as well as shading of the swimming pool at that mid-rise tower…

http://t.co/nt4ojv0es9


45-Storey Condo Proposed On Church Street Opposite Loblaws | via @urban_toronto

411 Church St, Page+Steele/IBI Group Architects, Toronto

Details of a proposed 45-storey condo development at 411 Church Street can be found on the City of Toronto's website in a Planning Rationale Report by the Goldberg Group, recently commissioned for the owners of the site, the Church/Wood Residences Limited Partnership...

Proposed for the southeast corner of Church and Wood, directly opposite Loblaws' and Ryerson's Maple Leafs Gardens site, the new structure in its current form could add 583 residential units spread across a 38-storey tower which would sit atop a 7-storey podium…

While the design elements are not expected to be an issue, the proposed height of the structure will likely be the cause of much debate as this proposal proceeds through the planning process. At 45 storeys, 411 Church would tower above its neighbours, including, perhaps most significantly, the adjacent Church Street Junior Public School to the north. Those opposed to the potential public concerns of height, density, and the related issues of shadows and overcrowding, will more than likely cite the City's recent reduction to 37 storeys of the planned project immediately to the south at 70 Carlton Street, as reason enough to be cautious of anything approaching (and especially exceeding) this height…

The debate over height will likely focus—amidst the previously mentioned concerns over density, etc.—on the issue of how significant of an impact the tower will have on sunlight and shadows in the immediate vicinity, especially considering the proximity of the local public school which will have its playground in shadow for the majority of the afternoon from lunch to last bell. While the report does its best to assuage fears that the the school will be cast into permanent darkness (it will not), there will be segments of the day, ranging from one to three hours at a time depending on the season, that the school would be bathed in shadow…

http://t.co/9CUxLKokjY


Extension casts a shadow next door | via @commnewsgroup

d442959cWC.jpg

A famly in the Anchorage Estate in Rockingham are looking to relocate after an extension to a neighbouring property has impacted on theirs.

Miriam Gurgel said the second-storey addition to her neighbour’s home has cut out the northern sun, creating a shadow in the afternoon that casts across most of her home’s back yard…

http://t.co/0T7vU8g9fG


Shadow concerns >

New Waterfront High-Rise Approved For 75 Howard Street | Hoodline

75howard1

Yesterday, the Planning Commission voted 5–1 to approve a new high-rise for 75 Howard St., including approval for a 10 percent height increase, to 220 feet…

The new building has some opposition: a contingent of neighbors, including residents and businesses, are aiming to get its design altered, at a minimum…First and foremost is that the new building will cast shadows on Rincon Park because it doesn't "step down" as it nears the waterfront.

David Osgood of Rincon Neighbors sent a letter to the Commissioners on August 17th, outlining what he called "several critical procedural and substantive flaws" with the project. He also sent an email asking for a delay, which was not granted. The letter includes a shadow diagram and describes concerns regarding height limits, step-downs, setbacks, lack of on-site affordable housing, traffic and privacy.

http://t.co/Fl0x01Dl5P


Interesting article on green roofs >

How cities can beat the heat

As Earth's climate changes over the coming decades, global warming will hit metropolitan areas especially hard because their buildings and pavements readily absorb sunlight and raise local temperatures, a phenomenon known as the urban heat island effect. Cities, as a result, stand a greater chance of extreme hot spells that can kill…

In 2009, Toronto, Canada, became the first city in North America to adopt a green-roof policy. It requires new buildings above a certain size to be topped with plants in the hope that they will retain storm water and keep temperatures down. Los Angeles, California, mandated in 2014 that new and renovated homes install 'cool roofs' made of light-coloured materials that reflect sunlight. A French law approved in March calls for the rooftops of new buildings in commercial zones to be partially covered in plants or solar panels…

http://t.co/yCUTNyAUsd


NASA Explains Why You Should Live On A Tree-Lined Street And A Tree-Lined City

A new NASA study shows that trees and plant-life are essential to keeping our cities cool and not just because they’re nice to sit under on a sunny day…

Cities are like giant storage heaters made up of what NASA calls "impervious surfaces"—roads, buildings, concrete. This causes what's known as the urban heat island effect, where a city’s temperature is set a few degrees above the surrounding countryside thanks to the heat retention of all that city infrastructure…

http://t.co/RvHjPrgZEt


How the city decides who can cast a long shadow | by @Banquos_Banquet @Spacing

Spacing Mag - sunny side

http://t.co/TzD0fC0Nwe


Why New York City will always be hooked on high rise

The Chrysler Building was the tallest building in New York from 1930-31

Over the summer, some public officials issued a letter to Mayor de Blasio’s City Planning chair, Carl Weisbrod voicing concerns over “super-tall” buildings along the 57th Street corridor below Central Park.

Among their grievances listed were the lack of approval needed to build these large towers, the shadows cast over Central Park, the vulnerability of historic resources, construction safety, and tax subsidies related to the previous 421-a program.

Chair Weisbrod acknowledged the importance of Central Park as a public amenity, but he also emphasized the importance of as-of-right development to New York City’s built environment, its economy, and its character as a global city…

Weisbrod points out that “the shadows of tall, slender towers move more swiftly and efficiently than those of squatter buildings with a similar built FAR,” meaning that newly-designed towers have less of a shadow impact on Central Park than older, bulkier buildings, and are therefore less of an impact to the park…

http://t.co/OC6LvJpMe5


Solar-powered building left in the dark after Edmonton OKs towers

This rendering shows the proposed 10-storey tower next door, which has solar panels that would be in the shade from the recently approved tower.

City councillors approved three new 40-plus storey towers downtown Tuesday, but the massive development will leave a solar-powered building next door in the shade…

http://t.co/aCm62fqSof


Yonge St reborn, from the lake to Eglinton >

Two ends of Toronto's condo boom town

A view of the Aura Condo building in downtown Toronto on the evening of August 11, 2015. The building features a unique light installation that shines throughout the evening.

Toronto’s once-derelict main street is in the midst of the most remarkable transformation in its history, with more than 20,000 condos that will house more than 30,000 people — the population of Orillia — under construction or in the planning stages.

And that’s just in a seven-kilometre stretch from Lake Ontario to the hotbed of midtown condo construction at Yonge St. and Eglinton Ave…

http://on.thestar.com/1JuI43r

https://t.co/VallyxW83a


Canberra Liberals to repeal solar access laws if party wins 2016 election | via @ABCNews

Overshadowing of a typical house at noon in the suburb of Wright in Canberra.

The Canberra Liberals have vowed to repeal the ACT Government's solar access laws if they win government at next year's election.

The laws, introduced in 2013, are designed to ensure new houses are positioned to maximise the benefits of natural sunlight and reduce heating costs.

They also prevent a development or extension from casting too much shade on a neighbouring home.

The Canberra Liberals tried to block the changes to the planning regulations, but they were passed with the support of the Greens..

http://t.co/UFLCuZ2eIx


Cheers, Ralph

Miscellaneous “Sun & Shadow” Items – September 2015


The following are miscellaneous sun, shade, solar and solar energy facts and comments. They were derived from our twitter feed @SunPosition

Our monthly sunrise/sunset tables have been updated

http://www.sunposition.com/tables.html


Bad news: Toronto is losing 3 min of daylight per day (1.5 hrs this month). Good news: Toronto still has more daylight hours than Miami.


Great pics! >

“@Havenlust: Sunset One Minute Ago  ;-) Samsung Mobile S6  #europe #zeeland #samsung #sunset http://t.co/8RFrIsGFrM


A lot of beautiful sunsets tonight (Sep 9/15) judging from Twitter activity.


At the Equinox the sun will cross the Equator roughly 840 km east and 220 km south of Mogadishu. Sep 23, 8:21 AM UT (4:21 AM EDT)


A rare event Sunday night Sep 27 - a perigee lunar eclipse. Super Blood Moon - http://t.co/hhoEjMTMKR


Torontohenge, When the Sun lines up | by @Banquos_Banquet @spacing - http://t.co/ltDAQv4yuV

Spacing Mag - torontohenge


Canberra Liberals to repeal solar access laws if party wins 2016 election http://t.co/UFLCuZ2eIx via @ABCNews

Overshadowing of a typical house at noon in the suburb of Wright in Canberra.

The Canberra Liberals have vowed to repeal the ACT Government's solar access laws if they win government at next year's election.

The laws, introduced in 2013, are designed to ensure new houses are positioned to maximise the benefits of natural sunlight and reduce heating costs.

They also prevent a development or extension from casting too much shade on a neighbouring home.

The Canberra Liberals tried to block the changes to the planning regulations, but they were passed with the support of the Greens…


Cheers, Ralph